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Win a custom 250GB Alien Spidy Xbox 360 console & more!
3 years ago

Win a custom 250GB Alien Spidy Xbox 360 console & more!

AlienSpidy

Thanks to our friends at Kalypso Media and Reverb Publishing, we have another great console prize package to give away. As listed above, we are giving out the custom 250 GB Alien Spidy Xbox 360 and more! We were very excited to get a hold of this prize package, but we’re not keeping it for ourselves. One lucky site reader will be gaming on this console very soon! All you need to do to enter this contest is answer the following question in the comment section below:

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Xbox One unveiled
3 years ago

Xbox One unveiled

Xbox One

After years of waiting and speculating on the part of gamers and the press, Microsoft President of Interactive Entertainment Business Don Mattrick today unveiled the company's next-generation console, the Xbox One, at an event broadcast live from Microsoft's Redmond, WA campus. The new console, which will launch worldwide later this year, is the successor to Microsoft's Xbox 360 console, which launched in November of 2005. The Xbox One is Microsoft's third home video game console, with the original Xbox having been launched in November 2001.

In a stark contrast from competitor Sony's PlayStation 4 unveiling, Microsoft showed the world what the Xbox One console (pictured above), controller and Kinect sensor looked like almost immediately at the start of the event. All three piees of hardware are primarily black, with the Xbox One and Kinect sensor having hard rectangular shapes. The new controller appears similar in shape to the old one, but has an improved d-pad, triggers and more. Microsoft promised that there are 40 design innovations in the new controller.

Though much of the show failed to focus on actual games, Phil Spencer, corporate vice president of Microsoft Studios, revealed that Microsoft is working on more than a dozen Xbox One games. "We have more titles in development now than in any other time in Xbox history," said Spencer. "I'm proud to announce that Microsoft Studios plans to release 15 new games in the first year of Xbox One." Spencer stated that eight of those titles are brand new franchises.

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What do developers want from the next-gen XBLA?
3 years ago

What do developers want from the next-gen XBLA?

Tomorrow at 10 am PDT, Microsoft will likely tell us all some things we already know. The Xbox creator will also tell us plenty that we don't already know. Some rumors will probably be proven true, others false. New games and features will be discussed and, in some cases, shown. Ultimately, the curtain is going to fall on Microsoft's event before the public hears everything it wants to hear. Microsoft is only going to tease us, with a more complete showing of all its console plans for the years ahead not coming until the console holder's traditional pre-E3 media briefing on June 10.

But tomorrow we will know something we don't know today. We'll know something about what direction Microsoft plans to steer the Xbox brand in over the course of the next generation. Sitting here right now, I can honestly say that I know nothing more than any other gamer who's followed the supposed leaks over the past few years knows about what we're going to see tomorrow. Rather than make educated guesses about what might be shown tomorrow and at E3, XBLAFans is following up last week's look at how developers feel about XBLA as it currently stands by having them speak about where they want to see it go in the next generation.

During PAX East this past March, we cornered six game developers and asked them one question: If you could change any one thing or add any one feature to the next-generation version of Xbox Live Arcade, what would it be?

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For indies, working with Microsoft is a horrifying mess…right?
3 years ago

For indies, working with Microsoft is a horrifying mess…right?

Microsoft

Dead Space's Isaac Clarke once had to drill into his own eyeball in order to survive a ship infested with mutated freaks. Altaïr Ibn-La'Ahad of Assassin's Creed fame was made to part with a portion of one of his fingers in order to join the Levantine Brotherhood of Assassins. Tomb Raider's Lara Croft once had the misfortune of falling onto a piece of sharpened rebar that pierced her midsection — and all she was trying to do was go for a nice little exploratory boat ride. And that's not even mentioning the myriad scores of locust soldiers that have found themselves on the wrong end of Marcus Fenix's trusty chainsaw or colossal boots over the years.

You don't hear any of them complaining about having to endure those, shall we way, slightly disagreeable circumstances, though, do you? That's because those mere flesh wounds were nothing when compared to the great tragedy of our time: working with a certain platform holder to release your independent studio's game on Xbox Live Arcade. I shudder at the very thought.

If you've followed Xbox Live Arcade over the past several years here and on other sites, then you already know of what I speak. There lives in Redmond, Washington a great beast, massive in size with glowing red-ringed eyes of fury. It is a devious creature hellbent on tricking those smaller than it into believing they're partners, only to turn on them in their hour of need, stomping down on their hopes and dreams harder than Fenix has brought down his boots on so many locust heads. Such disdain does this gluttonous monstrosity have for the smaller creatures roaming the forest of the game industry, that it is more than happy to sacrifice its own interests if it means snuffing out the light of those cowering under its great shadow.

So evil is this…Wait. Isn't this getting just a little out of hand? Is Microsoft really that terrible of a company? Does it truly care nothing for the needs of independent game developers? Is its thirst for video game console dominance so insatiable that it doesn't mind torpedoing its, um, pursuit of video game console dominance so long as it means making life miserable for independent game studios that, by developing games for its platform, are actively working to help it succeed with its, uh, video game console dominance? It is if you've listened to the little guys with big megaphones.

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Trials Tuesday – Episode 13
3 years ago

Trials Tuesday – Episode 13

A supercross, a ninja track and a jaunt under the sea
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Red Ring of Death: Xbox pathologist explains the plague
3 years ago

Red Ring of Death: Xbox pathologist explains the plague

Peyregne portrait

Mere weeks after the launch of the hotly anticipated Xbox 360 in 2005, rumor spread like wildfire of a dreaded video-game Grim Reaper. We didn't know why, how or when he would strike — all we knew was that he manifested himself with three red lights, cursing 360 consoles with a permanent GAME OVER. Microsoft ensured us that it was a minor problem that happened only to a select few, but time eventually revealed the ugly truth: everyone was at risk. After class-action lawsuits and bitter word of mouth, Microsoft finally put a three-year warranty in place, guaranteeing that all systems affected by the red lights would be fixed at no charge.

Chances are you have your own story about the Three Red Lights of Death. Perhaps your console was under warranty and returned after a few weeks. Maybe you bought a new one to skip the wait. You may have even cracked it open and somehow fixed the problem yourself. For me, my first system was killed by Overlord, one month before the launch of Halo 3. Four years later, my second system croaked after the first level of Gears of War 3, at which point in time the warranty had expired.

The Wizard of X

A replacement Xbox 360 Slim would have set me back at least $300, so I was somewhat relieved when my local GameStop referred me to David Peyregne, owner of Computers for Less. Peyregne is an experienced technician who has run his own business fixing computers and video game systems for over a decade. A former journalism student who turned to computer science, Peyregne sometimes lets his southern drawl come through his hollow voice that was scarred from polyps at a young age. With a husky explanation, he handed my system back to me, good as new, for $100, a sum much less daunting than the cost of a new console. Recently, I sat down with Peyregne to get the whole story on the Red Ring of Death: what causes it and how does Peyregne fix it? As it turns out, it took him a long time to figure it all out.

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What we are playing: May 12
3 years ago

What we are playing: May 12

What we are playing is a weekly column published on Sunday. Select members of the team talk about the games they’ve been playing over the past week and which they’re …
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Max: Curse of the Brotherhood preview: Imagining a world without miniguns
3 years ago

Max: Curse of the Brotherhood preview: Imagining a world without miniguns

Max: Curse of the Brotherhood XBLA

Max is your typical late-80s/early-90s video game or cartoon hero. He's an adventurous young boy, colorfully drawn to life with a an oversized golden mane and a t-shirt that bearing a prominent reminder of the letter his first name begins with. He lives in a picturesque home in a neighborhood that is presumably full of residents who don't know the meaning of the words "overcast" and "precipitation." At the start of his adventure, a monster arm that's more adorable than scary reaches out of his closet and nabs the little brother whom Max had just been fighting with. This event signals the beginning of an adventure that will see Max running through bright and varied environments and jumping over obstacles in his path.

But this isn't the late '80s. Nor is it the early '90s. This is 2013. And in 2013, game and cartoon characters have guns. Usually big guns. Take, for example, one of XBLA's most recent releases, Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon. Ubisoft's '80s love letter sealed with the blood of the titular dragons went so far as to give the player a minigun. Max: The Curse of the Brotherhood, however, does nothing of the sort.

"One of the things that is very appealing about this game is that Max isn't armed with a minigun or a samurai sword, but he has this ability to control different kinds of materials that are in themselves not very dangerous," says Mikkel Thorsted, studio director of Press Play, the developer behind Curse of the Brotherhood. "Basically he is armed with his imagination and wit, so basically when you encounter danger you have to outsmart the villainous henchmen. You have to outsmart them and lure them away, and stuff like that."

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EA acquires rights to develop Star Wars games; why that's a good thing
3 years ago

EA acquires rights to develop Star Wars games; why that's a good thing

ea_starwars

The shutdown of LucasArts by Disney early last month left many wondering about the fate of the Star Wars games. Disney had previously stated that their focus would be directed toward social games, and the with the demise of LucasArts fans wondered if all hope was lost. Who would save us from a sea of Star Wars Facebook and mobile games? Then an unlikely hero emerged. EA stepped in.

The announcement came yesterday to mixed reception. Some were optimistic, others were quick to point out EA's reputation as the Consumerist's Worst Company In America. On Twitter the #starwarsnextgen hash tag began to trend with ideas for new Star Wars titles, the majority coupling Star Wars Battlefront III with the Battlefield series engine, EA DICE at the helm. Others clamored for a new, non-MMO installment to the Knights of the Old Republic series.

Regardless of how you feel, it's a very exciting time to be a Star Wars fan and a gamer. With LucasArts' relatively poor showing the last 5-8 years there's really only one direction Star Wars games can go. Up. So let's take a few minutes to assess just why EA is a great choice for the franchise, and take a few more to note some potential caveats as well.

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